Marine training courses

Sea Turtle Biology and Ecology course

This one week course is carried out at Pacuare Nature Reserve located on the Caribbean coast of Costa Rica. The reserve hosts the most important leatherback sea turtle population of Costa Rica, the fourth largest population in the world. This course consists of lectures on NOA marine ecology including: 

 introduction to sea turtles´ biology and ecology (characteristics of the Atlantic Ocean, sea turtle species, life cicle, reproduction, migrations and threats), nesting females´ ecology ( biology and nesting behavior), leatherback hatchlings´ biology and ethology (biological characteristics, sex ratios, behaviour), global threats  (fisheries, anthropogenic impact, global warming) and marine conservation (actual research and future perspectives).

Sea turtle Biology and Ecology research work course

Students will have the opportunity to apply the knowledge learned in the Sea Turtle Biology and Ecology course for one to six weeks of research work. During this time, students will perform field work to obtain data of the nesting Leatherback females at Pacuare Nature Reserve. With this data, students will be able to make reliable estimates of demographic trends, distributions, ocean productivity and ecological interactions among sea turtles and the environment. Also with the scientific data that students will collect, we will have better insight regarding techniques essential to improving monitoring and management conservation strategies to mitigate the effects of climate change

Pacific cetaceans ecology and ethology

This one to two week course is located in Drake Bay (Osa peninsula) in Corcovado National Park, on the Pacific coast of Costa Rica. This National Park hosts one of the highest biodiversities of marine mammals in the world. This course involves a series of lectures such as an introduction to Pacific marine ecology (characteristics of the Pacific Ocean, bioproductivity, marine currents), cetaceans identification (main cetaceans species found in Corcovado National Park), cetaceans biology and ethology (species biology, migrations and species behaviour), marine survey methods (photo identification census method, behaviour survey), global threats to the ceatceans (fisheries, anthropogenic impact, global warming) and marine conservation.

 

Pacific cetaceans biology and ecology research work course

Students will have the opportunity to apply the knowledge learned in the Pacific cetaceans biology and ecology course for one to six weeks of research work. During this time, students will perform field work to obtain data of the cetaceans present in Corcovado National Park. In the practical, students will perform cetaceans photo identification surveys. Students will be divided into groups that will rotate throughout the practical. One group will participate in the photo identification census of the cetaceans communities in different sites of Corcovado Marine National Park and the other group will participate in the behavior survey of the cetaceans communities encountered (these surveys will be done by boat in different days). Students will also learn to analyze the results obtained from the monitoring surveys.The main research goal is to complete an annual monitoring of cetaceans communities in Corcovado Marine National Park in order to assess the effectiveness of management strategies. Another goal is to study the cetaceans´ behavior to understand better this species.

Facilities:

Students will stay in cabins in Drake Bay and the three meals per day will be included. 

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Coral reef ecology and sea turtle conservation course

This twelve-day program is located in Akumal, a small town bordered by the Mesoamerican Reef  on the Caribbean coast of Mexico. The Mesoamerican Reef is the second largest coral reef system in the world. NOA collaborates with Centro Ecologico Akumal (CEA), a non profit organization that produces and promotes strategies for ecosystem management in Akumal, through research, education and policy, for sustainability in the Mexican Caribbean.

The first week of this course consists of lectures such as an introduction to coral reef systems (characteristics of coral reefs, reef  formation, reef distribution), coral identification, reef  fish identification (main fish species used in the AGGRA methodology), marine survey methods (AGGRA reef fish monitoring methodology),  global threats to reefs (fisheries, anthropogenic impact, global warming) and marine conservation. You will have also the opportunity to snorkel in the turquoise and warm waters to study the rich biodiversity of the coral reefs and practice the scientific method. During the second week, you will participate in the CEA's Sea Turtle Conservation Program, being part of a research team studying the nesting sea turtles of the bay during night patrols. This week will also include an environmental education day and an adventure to the Mayan ruins

Coral reef ecology and Open Water Diver Course

This twelve-day program is located in Akumal, a small town bordered by the Mesoamerican Reef  on the Caribbean coast of Mexico. The Mesoamerican Reef is the second largest coral reef system in the world. NOA collaborates with Centro Ecologico Akumal (CEA), a non profit organization that produces and promotes strategies for ecosystem management in Akumal, through research, education and policy, for sustainability in the Mexican Caribbean.

The first week you will take the PADI Open Water Diver training course. During this week you will be taught to dive and explore the underwater world by a professional PADI diving instructor. Completion of this course will give you an internationally recognized PADI diving qualification which may enable them to join other NOA marine research courses. The second week of this course consists of lectures such as an introduction to coral reef systems (characteristics of coral reefs, reef formation, reef distribution), coral identification, reef  fish identification (main fish species used in the AGGRA methodology), marine survey methods (AGGRA reef fish monitoring methodology),  global threats to reefs (fisheries, anthropogenic impact, global warming) and marine conservation. You will also participate in the CEA's Sea Turtle Conservation Program, an environmental education day and explore the Mayan ruins

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Connect with NOA :

Phone number:

+506 84635041 / +506 85277002

e-mail: info@noaoceans.org

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